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About the modern shot technique (3:23)

USPTA Professional Brett Hobden discusses the issue of modern shot technique, the technical and tactical changes it brings to the game and its role in the development of a player's game. (Presented by Brett Hobden) | 13907 Views


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Media Added: 10/12/10 Views: 13907
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Modern tennis for modern times

by Tom Daglis, USPTA vice president
 
Tom Daglis

July 2005 -- To date, we have offered player development instructional inserts that have helped USPTA members have a better understanding of modern tennis. These inserts have provided an effective template for modern tennis with insight into an alternate style of play. But how does modern tennis interface with modern times? As tennis teachers, we see how the touring professionals play and we can use specific teaching styles and techniques in developing junior players who have the opportunity to excel in the competitive arena. So, the question is how do we implement this information into our daily teaching? What about a junior beginner group of 7- to 8-year-olds? What about your 3.0 club ladies and league players? What about the adult men’s competitive drill groups?

Individual decisions need to be made by each of you, regarding when and where you should teach and apply this information. Should you modify stroke techniques? How do you incorporate a games approach using modern tennis? Are you able to increase your lesson base and can you demonstrate a successful increase in ability levels?

Personally, I am incorporating much of this new information into our Professional Tennis Management curriculum at Ferris State University. The reason for that is the demand. The new students that come into our program play a certain way – more topspin, more power, less patience.

Go through a checklist of questions to help you evaluate: How much racquet head acceleration can your student generate? How mobile is your student? Do they need more time to recover from shots? Is the desire to generate more power a greater incentive for your student? How much topspin can your student impart?

Young players will emulate tour players and if you do not provide them with guidelines, suggestions and a course of action to help them play like their heroes, their incentive to play may be diminished.

Do we forget about conventional teaching styles? Absolutely not! Our goal is to improve a client’s ability level and we must apply any means possible to achieve that goal. Modern tennis is simply another tool kit. Consider this analogy: Your student is like an automobile in need of some instructional repair. He is put together using the English measurement system, however, your tools are calibrated on the metric measurement system. It is difficult to use the tools from one toolbox to fix the specific needs or reach the desired goals of a student who is calibrated differently. Both are effective toolboxes, however, an effective mechanic will need to have both toolboxes to handle the market demand.

You are in control of which set of tools to use. You are the professional and it is your professional opinion that counts. Evaluate your students, study their skills, determine the areas that need improvement and select the appropriate set of tools!

Grips, stances, follow-throughs – you decide – you’re the pro! Now complete the modern tennis crossword puzzle and see how you do!

Across
1. The branch that researches mental ­factors in the attainment of athletic skills and ­performance is known as sport _________.

3. A vector quantity that tends to produce an acceleration of a body segment or the action of a racquet in the direction of its application is known as a _________.

6. The type of controlled balance that is found when the body is stationary.

8. The most common forehand grip found with modern stroke technique is _________.

11. With the aid of technology and modern stroke technique, this shot has become more of a weapon than when it is used in ­traditional stroke technique games.

12. This type of forehand stance is most common in the modern stroke technique.

13. The type of controlled balance that is found when the body is in motion.

14. With traditional tennis tactics, this shot is customarily hit with slice and with modern tennis tactics, it is customarily hit with topspin.

16. With the amount of racquet head acceleration used in modern tennis stroke techniques, these lobs are less ­popular.

Down
2. This term is used when describing the action of the ­outside leg during a modern groundstroke technique.

3. This grip has an advantage when hitting high-bouncing balls aggressively _________.

4. The most common forehand grip found with traditional stroke technique is _________.

5. This term best describes traditional tennis stroke ­technique.

7. This term best describes modern tennis stroke technique.

9. This type of forehand stance is most common in the ­traditional stroke technique.

10. The part of the racquet that can be described on a ­modern forehand to “point to the ground, point to the ball, point to the target area” can be described as the _________.

12. Common tennis injuries such as shin splints, tennis elbow and rotator cuff tendon inflammation are also known as _________ injuries.

15. This body segment is instrumental for effective rotation during a modern two-handed backhand stroke.

Crosspword at - http://www.addvantageuspta.com/html/Crossword.pdf
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